Lincoln Cathedral Stonemasons

Lincoln Cathedral is fortunate to have a team of skilled stonemasons. They are responsible for both replacing carvings damaged by the passage of time and creating new imagery which will be enjoyed by visitors in the future. The image on the right is thought by some to b read more

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A Book of Hours and a Medieval Herbal

It’s been a while since I posted new work here – not because there isn’t any new work but because there is so much work to be done that I haven’t got around to writing about it! I thought I would show you a couple of pieces which show the contras read more

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Manuscript illumination courses

Manuscript illumination courses

My March workshop at the Heritage Skills Centre, Lincoln Castle, booked up so quickly that several new dates have been added – and several new workshops.             New Manuscript Illumination Course Dates. I will be running my introductory course on May 7th and September 17th. The booking link for the May workshop is here. The course is designed to be a ‘taster’ session, starting with the use of...

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Noah’s Ark

Images of Noah’s ark are relatively common in medieval art, the story of the flood being familiar to Christians, Jews and Muslims alike. Lincoln Cathedral’s image of the ark is found in the stained glass at the east end of the building. The glass dates back to the early 13th century and shows Noah, the dove and an interesting vessel with a masonry structure and wooden hull. A similar image can be seen in a manuscript of the same...

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How to Make Walnut Ink

How to Make Walnut Ink

This brown ink is easy to make and can be used with a dip pen or brush. There are lots of recipes on the internet, all with different additions to stop the ink going mouldy and flow more easily, but before I get to that, here’s the basic process.           1. Collect walnuts. The part of the walnut you need is the husk, not the nut. When the walnuts fall they are green. Ours had been lying about for a while on wet...

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Mining for Ochre at Clearwell Caves

Mining for Ochre at Clearwell Caves

We were down in the beautiful Forest of Dean earlier this year and came, quite unexpectedly, across Clearwell Caves. The sign outside stated that the caves were mined for pigments and iron ore, so we just had to go and have a look!     It is said that colours have been mined there for 4000 years. Since the 13th century, Clearwell Caves have been the sole territory of Freeminers – males born within the hundred of St Briavels,...

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